Monthly Archives: August 2016

Helathy tips to more happiness in the future

unduhan-39Tobacco cessation is not a one-time treatment. It’s not like taking an antibiotic for an infection – tobacco addiction is a chronic, lifelong condition that requires lifelong maintenance. Staying quit is the final, most important stage of a process that is characterized by relapse. If you are fighting to stay tobacco free, being prepared for the situations and urges that lead to relapse is critical, as is being committed to taking aggressive action to stay quit.

When symptoms such as depression, insomnia and irritability hit, find positive ways to work through the symptoms. Download the “I Quit Using Tobacco, and Now I’m Feeling…” tear sheet

“Slips”

Most “slips” occur within the first week of quitting smoking. If you slip – that is, if you have a puff, or one or two cigarettes after you’ve quit – it does not mean that you will start smoking again and incur a full-blown relapse. Many people do relapse after a slip, so it is important to remember not to “allow” yourself a slip because you think you can stop after one cigarette.

The Hazards of “Just One”

Very often a single slip triggers negative feelings, self-criticism, and depression. This may lead to a sense that you have no control and, possibly, to more slips. Several slips in a row, or facing conditions where you are seriously tempted to start smoking again, may increase the chance that you will relapse.

When you are faced with a strong temptation to smoke:

  • Recognize the many health benefits you enjoy since you quit smoking.
  • Avoid thinking that one cigarette won’t hurt you. Most likely, one cigarette will not be enough and usually it just “primes the pump” and makes you want more.
  • Remember how hard it was to quit, and realize that you don’t want to face that struggle again.

 

I Slipped. What Now?

  • Recognize the slip for what it is – a brief return to an old behavior, an action that should be seen as a warning sign that you have begun the slide toward a relapse to smoking. With a renewed effort you can stop the slide and stay on track.
  • Slips are not signs of failure. Make sure that you don’t give up completely on your efforts to quit.
  • Talk with one of your support people, such as a family member, another person who has quit, or your doctor.
  • Make cigarettes hard to get. Don’t buy a pack. Don’t go places where it is easy to get one from someone else.
  • Don’t let yourself have another cigarette for at least 2 hours. Then decide if you really need it.
  • Review your smoking journal or your list of reasons to quit, then decide to take control again. Remember past situations in which you showed strength and see yourself as a strong, capable person who has already come far.

Relapse

Strong desires to smoke can happen sometimes months or even years after you’ve quit. Often, these unexpected urges can be the most dangerous. But relapse never occurs in a vacuum – there is always a triggering event or circumstance that creates craving, poor judgment, and ultimately tobacco use.

Common Relapse Triggers

  • Being around tobacco users
  • Drinking alcohol
  • Feeling hurried, overwhelmed or stressed
  • Being overconfident
  • Being isolated from supportive friends and loved ones
  • Having feelings of anger, self-pity or entitlement
  • Not complying with treatment recommendations
  • Feeling tired, poor sleep quality
  • Overworking
  • Not taking time for yourself
  • Negative, pessimistic attitude
  • Stress

You can use the same methods to stay quit as you did to help you through withdrawal. Think ahead to those times when you may be tempted to smoke and plan on how you will use alternatives and activities to cope with these situations. For instance, remember why you quit (was it for your health? your children?) and use your withdrawal methods to “redirect” your urge to smoke.

Find coping skills like managing cravings, redirection, creating positive actions, and get information about common triggers and solutions at ourProviders page.

Is That Right If Menthol Cigarettes Riskier Than Non Menthol

images-32People who smoke menthol cigarettes are no more likely and may actually be less likely to develop lung cancer than people who smoke non-menthol cigarettes, a study suggests.

The study, published online in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, comes out nearly a week after an FDA advisory panel stated that removing menthol cigarettes from the market may improve public health because menthol cigarettes may be more difficult to quit than non-menthol cigarettes and may be more enticing to young smokers because of their minty taste.

Menthol cigarettes are also more popular with African-American smokers, who have a higher incidence of lung cancer.

Slideshow: 13 Best Quit-Smoking Tips Ever
Menthol Cigarettes and Lung Cancer
But “the new study information almost closes the door on the lung cancer issue,” says study researcher William J. Blot, PhD, of the Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center in Nashville. “The main message is that cigarettes are harmful, regardless of whether they are menthol or non-menthol, and the best action is to quit smoking.”

“I don’t think there is enough scientific evidence to justify a ban of menthol cigarettes in comparison with non-menthol cigarettes,” Blot says.

In the study, researchers identified 440 people with lung cancer among 85,806 study participants from 12 Southern states. They compared the smoking status and cigarette preferences of lung cancer patients with those of 2,213 people without lung cancer.

They found that smoking menthol cigarettes was actually associated with a significantly lower rate of lung cancer and lung cancer deaths than smoking non-menthol cigarettes.

Among pack-a-day smokers, menthol smokers were 12 times more likely to develop lung cancer compared to never smokers; those who smoked non-menthol cigarettes were 21 times more likely to develop lung cancer than those who never smoked.

What’s more, smokers who chose menthol cigarettes also smoked fewer cigarettes per day than those who smoked non-menthol cigarettes, and the quitting rate was similar between both menthol and non-menthol smokers. Previous studies have suggested that it may be harder to quit if you smoke menthol cigarettes.

Now Blot and colleagues plan to look at biochemical markers of tobacco smoke to see if there are any important differences between African-American and white smokers and menthol and non-menthol smokers. “Menthol is off the table, but the reason why African-American men have higher rates of lung cancer is still not clear,” he says.

All Cigarettes Pose Health Risks
All cigarettes are created equal when it comes to health risks, says Len Horovitz, MD, a pulmonary specialist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. “Menthol cigarettes are as dangerous as non-menthol cigarettes and cigarettes are the No. 1 cause of heart disease, lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and other diseases.”

Regardless of whether you smoke menthol or non-menthol, “set a date after which you will be an ex-smoker,” he says. There are many smoking-cessation tools available today, including nicotine-replacement systems such as patches and gum.

Amy V. Lukowski, PsyD, clinical director of the Health Initiatives Programs at National Jewish Health in Denver, says that the study should not be interpreted to mean that menthol cigarettes are any safer than non-menthol cigarettes.

“Lung cancer is only part of the picture and smoking is known to cause heart disease, stroke, COPD, and so many other diseases,” she says. “Tobacco kills and we really need to focus our efforts on cessation for smokers and stopping people from starting in the first place.”

Debate Over a Ban on Menthol Cigarettes
Lukowski is in favor of a ban on menthol cigarettes. “Almost half of young people use menthol cigarettes due to their minty taste so this is an important product to not have on the market,” she says.

The new findings dovetail nicely with the FDA panel’s recent recommendation, says David Abrams, PhD, the executive director of the Steven A. Schroeder National Institute for Tobacco Research and Policy Studies at Legacy, a public health group that aims to stamp out tobacco smoking.

The FDA panel stated that it was not clear that menthol cigarettes caused any additional risks at the individual level to the individual smoker, he says.

Although the new study did not show that there was any difference in quitting success rates among menthol vs. non-menthol smokers, “other research suggests very strongly that menthol smokers want to quit more and have more difficulty with quitting and succeeding,” he says.

“More kids start with menthol cigarettes, and adults have more trouble quitting when they smoke menthol,” Abrams. “This evidence is consistent and strong enough to warrant a ban on menthol.”

Stop Smoking Is Good For Your Health

unduhan-38Stopping smoking is not easy. Below are some tips which may help you to quit smoking. At the end of the leaflet there are details of further resources that may help

Write a list of the reasons why you want to stop, and keep them with you. Refer to them when tempted to light up.

Set a date for stopping and stop completely. (Some people prefer the idea of cutting down gradually. However, research has shown that if you smoke fewer cigarettes than usual, you are likely to smoke more of each cigarette and nicotine levels remain nearly the same. Therefore, it is usually best to stop once and for all from a set date.)

Tell everyone that you are giving up smoking. Friends and family often give support and may help you. Smoking by others in the household makes giving up harder. If appropriate, try to get other household members who smoke, or friends who smoke, to stop smoking at the same time. A team effort may be easier than going it alone.

Get rid of ashtrays, lighters, and all cigarettes.

Be prepared for some withdrawal symptoms. When you stop smoking, you are likely to get symptoms which may include feeling sick (nausea), headaches, anxiety, irritability, craving, and just feeling awful. These symptoms are caused by the lack of nicotine that your body has been used to. They tend to peak after 12-24 hours and then gradually ease over 2-4 weeks.

Anticipate a cough. It is normal for a smoker’s cough to become worse when you stop smoking (as the airways ‘come back to life’). Many people say that this makes them feel worse for a while after stopping smoking and makes them tempted to restart smoking. Resist this temptation! The cough usually gradually eases.

Be aware of situations in which you are most likely to want to smoke. In particular, drinking alcohol is often associated with failing in an attempt to stop smoking. You should consider not drinking much alcohol in the first few weeks after stopping smoking. Try changing your routine for the first few weeks. For example, despite the UK ban on indoor smoking in pubs, outside the pub might still be a tempting place to drink alcohol and smoke. Also, if drinking tea and coffee are difficult times, try drinking mainly fruit juice and plenty of water instead.

Take one day at a time. Mark off each successful day on a calendar. Look at it when you feel tempted to smoke, and tell yourself that you don’t want to start all over again.

Be positive. You can tell people that you don’t smoke. You will smell better. After a few weeks you should feel better, taste your food more and cough less. You will have more money. Perhaps put away the money, which you would have spent on cigarettes, for treats.

Food. Some people worry about gaining weight when they give up smoking, as the appetite may improve. Anticipate an increase in appetite and try not to increase fatty or sugary foods as snacks. Try fruit and sugar-free gum instead.