Helathy tips to more happiness in the future

unduhan-39Tobacco cessation is not a one-time treatment. It’s not like taking an antibiotic for an infection – tobacco addiction is a chronic, lifelong condition that requires lifelong maintenance. Staying quit is the final, most important stage of a process that is characterized by relapse. If you are fighting to stay tobacco free, being prepared for the situations and urges that lead to relapse is critical, as is being committed to taking aggressive action to stay quit.

When symptoms such as depression, insomnia and irritability hit, find positive ways to work through the symptoms. Download the “I Quit Using Tobacco, and Now I’m Feeling…” tear sheet

“Slips”

Most “slips” occur within the first week of quitting smoking. If you slip – that is, if you have a puff, or one or two cigarettes after you’ve quit – it does not mean that you will start smoking again and incur a full-blown relapse. Many people do relapse after a slip, so it is important to remember not to “allow” yourself a slip because you think you can stop after one cigarette.

The Hazards of “Just One”

Very often a single slip triggers negative feelings, self-criticism, and depression. This may lead to a sense that you have no control and, possibly, to more slips. Several slips in a row, or facing conditions where you are seriously tempted to start smoking again, may increase the chance that you will relapse.

When you are faced with a strong temptation to smoke:

  • Recognize the many health benefits you enjoy since you quit smoking.
  • Avoid thinking that one cigarette won’t hurt you. Most likely, one cigarette will not be enough and usually it just “primes the pump” and makes you want more.
  • Remember how hard it was to quit, and realize that you don’t want to face that struggle again.

 

I Slipped. What Now?

  • Recognize the slip for what it is – a brief return to an old behavior, an action that should be seen as a warning sign that you have begun the slide toward a relapse to smoking. With a renewed effort you can stop the slide and stay on track.
  • Slips are not signs of failure. Make sure that you don’t give up completely on your efforts to quit.
  • Talk with one of your support people, such as a family member, another person who has quit, or your doctor.
  • Make cigarettes hard to get. Don’t buy a pack. Don’t go places where it is easy to get one from someone else.
  • Don’t let yourself have another cigarette for at least 2 hours. Then decide if you really need it.
  • Review your smoking journal or your list of reasons to quit, then decide to take control again. Remember past situations in which you showed strength and see yourself as a strong, capable person who has already come far.

Relapse

Strong desires to smoke can happen sometimes months or even years after you’ve quit. Often, these unexpected urges can be the most dangerous. But relapse never occurs in a vacuum – there is always a triggering event or circumstance that creates craving, poor judgment, and ultimately tobacco use.

Common Relapse Triggers

  • Being around tobacco users
  • Drinking alcohol
  • Feeling hurried, overwhelmed or stressed
  • Being overconfident
  • Being isolated from supportive friends and loved ones
  • Having feelings of anger, self-pity or entitlement
  • Not complying with treatment recommendations
  • Feeling tired, poor sleep quality
  • Overworking
  • Not taking time for yourself
  • Negative, pessimistic attitude
  • Stress

You can use the same methods to stay quit as you did to help you through withdrawal. Think ahead to those times when you may be tempted to smoke and plan on how you will use alternatives and activities to cope with these situations. For instance, remember why you quit (was it for your health? your children?) and use your withdrawal methods to “redirect” your urge to smoke.

Find coping skills like managing cravings, redirection, creating positive actions, and get information about common triggers and solutions at ourProviders page.